Events & Conferences

ISPS UK Webinar

Burnout in Mental Health Services: Abdullah Mia and Matthew Broome, in conversation  

Thursday 20 January 2022, 7pm- 8pm GMT

The pandemic has created the conditions for burnout, exhaustion and moral injury to thrive in mental health services. Against an existing backdrop of cuts, Covid-19 has put intense pressure on health services, including through the reallocation of resources. Over the past two years, secondary and specialist mental health services have often found themselves sidelined and under-resourced. People who experience psychosis have not always been able to access support, and some have found themselves actively neglected. Mental health practitioners have been both overstretched, and acutely aware of the limits of the support they are able to provide.

This conversation will explore the burnout experienced by many mental health practitioners through the lens of moral injury, where people have engaged in, failed to prevent, or witnessed acts that conflict with their values or beliefs. How has the pandemic affected practitioners and teams in secondary and specialist mental health services? How have the conversations generated by Black Lives Matter impacted on racialised people in the sector?

A one hour webinar can’t provide a fix or clear answers, but naming things might offer a way forward. At a time where so many of us are exhausted and isolated, this is a small space for solidarity and dialogue around the complexities of moral injury and burnout in mental health services.

Dr Abdullah Mia is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist within an NHS male medium-secure unit in Birmingham. He has additional training in group analysis and organisational dynamics, along with different therapeutic approaches. In addition to his professional training, he is engaged in community psychology work to develop his local community to develop groups to build connection and support inclusive and across a number of diverse characteristics.

Abdullah is interested in how to support oppressed voices to be heard in places to create change and shine a light on alternative narratives. This involves the valuing and building of networks of resistance against conscious and unconscious anxious enactments, which can lead to abuses of power and authority. In particular, he focuses on how institutional and systemic racism impacts upon the mental health of employees and people who use services.

Professor Matthew Broome is an academic psychiatrist and Director of the Institute for Mental Health at the University. He is a leader in the field of early psychosis and in the philosophy and ethics of mental health.

Their conversation will be introduced by Akiko Hart, ISPS UK Chair, and CEO of the National Survivor User Network.

ISPS UK AGM (20.00-20.30)

Following the end of the webinar at 20.00, attendees are invited to join the ISPS UK Annual General Meeting (open to both members and non-members).

Tickets

Places are £5, or free for ISPS UK members or people on a low wage. You can join ISPS UK here.

To secure your place at the webinar, go to https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/burnout-in-mental-health-services-tickets-239924750387

Sep
23
Tue
2014
An Evening with Rufus May & Tony Morrison @ Liverpool Quaker Meeting House
Sep 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

An event for professionals who work with people with psychosis, and for those with personal experience of psychosis and their families and friends.

Pharmacological and psychosocial approaches to treatment of psychosis: Is it time for choice?

Tony Morrison is a Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Manchester and is also Associate Director for Clinical Research at Greater Manchester West Mental Health Foundation Trust. He has published over 100 articles on cognitive therapy for psychosis and experimental studies of cognitive processes in psychosis, including an influential cognitive model of psychosis, and has conducted several treatment trials of cognitive therapy for psychosis and for people at high risk of psychosis

No Fear Psychosis: How do we reduce the fear of different mind states?

Rufus May (www.rufusmay.com) has worked as a psychologist in the NHS for 18 years. Originally inspired by his own experiences of coming through powerful mind states and receiving traditional psychiatric practices he trained as a psychologist to help develop and promote more holistic approaches. He has been facilitating Hearing Voice groups since 2001. His interests include voice dialogue, mindfulness, non-violent communication and community education approaches.

Download: ISPS UK Liverpool Event Flyer

Jul
31
Tue
2018
Compassion & Compulsion: exploring the tensions faced by service users & clinicians when people experience psychosis. @ St Cuthbert's Church
Jul 31 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

David Pilgrim will do a presentation about the issues faced by mental health services when using coercion. Jen Kilyon and Neil Caton will then give a response to the paper after which we will open up to questions and comments from the audience.

David Pilgrim is Honorary Professor of Health and Social Care, University of Liverpool and Visiting Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Southampton. He has published extensively in the field of mental health policy.

Jen Kilyon campaigns for genuine informed choice in mental health care where those who need it can be in a safe place that is right for them. She promotes respectful non-judgemental and family/network inclusive approaches to psychosis such as Open Dialogue. Jen is an ISPSUK and Soteria Network Trustee and helped to set up the first Soteria House in the UK.

Neil Caton has lived experience of psychosis and has several experiences of being admitted to psychiatric unit, one of which was compulsory. He will explore his experience of these admissions.

Neil has worked as an involvement worker for the early intervention service. He has been an ISPS trustee for 5 years and runs a hearing voices and paranoia group in Chorley.