Events & Conferences

Nov
26
Sat
2016
Trauma and Psychosis: perspectives on psychodynamics @ Amnesty International
Nov 26 @ 9:00 am – 4:45 pm

Trauma and psychosis: perspectives on psychodynamics

9.00 – 4.45pm, Saturday 26th November 2016

@ Amnesty International, 17-25 New Inn Yard, London, EC2A

Contributors:  

Ann Scott, Brian Martindale, Carine Minne, Dirk Corstens, Dolly Sen, John Read, Jo Stubley, Rai Waddingham and Ruth Forrest

Download: ISPS UK Psychodynamic Conference Programme & Poster

It is widely accepted that trauma can increase the likelihood of someone experiencing psychosis. Yet, in a field that is continually evolving, there is no simple answer to the question of how best to help someone struggling with psychosis to work through their experiences in psychotherapy. This conference explores key issues in understanding and working with people who experience psychosis and the impact of traumatic life experiences. Reflecting the context that we live and work in, it will create a dialogue between those who practise psychodynamic psychotherapy and those who experience psychosis first-hand.

Click here to book your place online


Outline programme

9.00     REGISTRATION, COFFEE

9.30     Chair’s introduction – Ann Scott

Perspectives on Trauma

9.45    The Therapeutic Relationship: What stays unsaid – Dolly Sen

10.15  Contemporary psychodynamic approaches to trauma – Jo Stubley

10.45  Discussion with Dolly, Jo and conference participants

11.15    COFFEE

Perspectives on Psychosis

11.45    Contemporary psychodynamic approaches to psychosis – Carine Minne

12.15    ‘If you see me you’ll die’: Understanding beliefs of toxicity and their impact on psychotherapy – Rai Waddingham

1.15       LUNCH

2.00      Open Space: A chance for participants to select topics that interest them for further small group discussion

3.00      TEA

Perspectives on Voice-Hearing

3.15       Discovering New Ways of Working with Voices: Psychodynamics and the Hearing Voices Movement – a dialogue with Dirk Corstens

4.00     Brief reflections on the day by John Read, Ruth Forrest and Brian Martingale, followed by discussion between all speakers and participants

4.45       CLOSE


 Conference Fees

  • ISPS UK Members – £105
  • Non-Members – £125
  • Subsidised Rate* (ISPS UK members only), for low-waged (<£12K) people with lived experience of psychosis and their families – £31.50

*Subsidised rates are limited.  As well as offering these places to those listed above, we may be in a position to allocate a few subsidised rates to student members of ISPS UK, but students will need to apply to the ISPS UK office rather than booking directly on-line (please contact Ali at admin@ispsuk.org).  Those with lived experience and their families may book directly on-line.

A limited number of free bursary places are available for low-waged (<£12K) ISPS UK members with personal experience of psychosis (either themselves or a family member) who have not recently benefited from a bursary place at one of our conference. Please e-mail Ali for more information.

If you would like to contribute to the ISPS UK bursary fund please click here.

For cancellations received more than one month before the date of the conference a 50% refund  will be offered; after this refunds will not be possible. However if you are unable to attend for any reason we are happy for you to send someone else in your place.

If you need an invoice, please include your purchase number in the email. This will make it much easier to find the necessary information.

Please contact Ali at admin@ispsuk.org to find out more about subsidised and/or bursary places.


Book Your Place Online

Aug
30
Wed
2017
The 20th International Congress of the ISPS: Making Real Change Happen
Aug 30 – Sep 3 all-day

ISPS International 2017 FlyerMaking Real Change Happen

30 August – 3 September
@ University of Liverpool

See: www.isps2017uk.org

Parallel sessions: Schedule

Download: ISPS International Flyer

Program: http://programme.exordo.com/isps2017/

Deadline for Abstracts: 1 December 2016

Deadline for Early Bird Bookings: 31 January 2017.

Plenary speakers include: Jacqui Dillon, Jim van Os, Kwame McKenzie, Alison Brabban, Grainne Fadden, Rachel Waddingham, Svein Friis, Jon Vidar Stromstad and Anne Berit Eie Torbjornsen.

Can a conference be a catalyst for change? It is exactly this wish that inspired the title and theme of the 2017 ISPS international congress.

Sadly this is a wish born out of frustration. Attitudes, practices and services too often seem barely touched by the steadily developing understanding of psychological and social aspects of psychosis and of what is helpful for people who experience it. So we aim for this conference to be not only about the valuable sharing of new research, ideas and developments, but also, as in the title, about making real change happen. The large number of organizations who have given their support to this conference can be seen here.

We are delighted to be meeting in the exciting city of Liverpool. Carl Jung saw it as ‘the pool of life’ and we hope its rich heritage (not just football and music!) will make it an energizing setting for a conference thinking about change. More information about the social programme will be available soon and meanwhile take a look at these ideas.

Delegates at previous international conferences have often commented on how ISPS events stand out. They point to the unique mix of opportunities not only to learn from high quality presentations, but also to join a rich dialogue between people with a wealth of experience and expertise, a fertile mix of professionals from a wide range of disciplines, and people whose experience and expertise comes through personal experience of psychosis.

ISPS conferences have also traditionally been warm and welcoming gatherings, where people go away feeling inspired and reinvigorated. We hope this one will be no exception and look forward very much to welcoming you to Liverpool in August 2017.

Alison Summers, Chair of ISPS 2017 organizing committee
Jan Olav Johannessen, Chair of ISPS

Feb
19
Mon
2018
Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS @ St Cuthberts Church
Feb 19 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Book your ticket for an evening of discussion and reflection around psychosocial approaches to psychosis, in Preston, Lancashire, on Monday 19th February.

The panel will each give a ten minute talk about the challenges and successes in regard to placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS. Then we will open the discussion up to the audience for debate and discussion.

The panel members are as follows:

Mick McKeown is Professor of democratic mental health at the University of Central Lancashire and is interested in clinical and political alliances for change in mental health services and wider society.

Helen Spandler is a Reader in mental health in the School of Social Work, Care and Community at UCLan and Managing Editor of Asylum: the magazine for democratic psychiatry.

Rufus May has worked as a clinical psychologist for 20 years. He manages the psychology team at the Royal Bolton hospital’s acute mental health in-patient service. He has an interest in holistic approaches to mental health. His interest is originally rooted in his own treatment for psychosis in his late teens. He volunteers with the Bradford Hearing voices group and provides some independent training with his partner Elisabeth Svanholmer (see www.openmindedonline.com)

Book your ticket here, free for ISPS UK members

 

Jul
31
Tue
2018
Compassion & Compulsion: exploring the tensions faced by service users & clinicians when people experience psychosis. @ St Cuthbert's Church
Jul 31 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

David Pilgrim will do a presentation about the issues faced by mental health services when using coercion. Jen Kilyon and Neil Caton will then give a response to the paper after which we will open up to questions and comments from the audience.

David Pilgrim is Honorary Professor of Health and Social Care, University of Liverpool and Visiting Professor of Clinical Psychology, University of Southampton. He has published extensively in the field of mental health policy.

Jen Kilyon campaigns for genuine informed choice in mental health care where those who need it can be in a safe place that is right for them. She promotes respectful non-judgemental and family/network inclusive approaches to psychosis such as Open Dialogue. Jen is an ISPSUK and Soteria Network Trustee and helped to set up the first Soteria House in the UK.

Neil Caton has lived experience of psychosis and has several experiences of being admitted to psychiatric unit, one of which was compulsory. He will explore his experience of these admissions.

Neil has worked as an involvement worker for the early intervention service. He has been an ISPS trustee for 5 years and runs a hearing voices and paranoia group in Chorley.

Nov
13
Tue
2018
Psychosis and Institutional Racism: ISPS UK Conference and AGM @ Amnest International
Nov 13 @ 10:00 am – 5:30 pm

Psychosis and institutional racism 

Institutional racism is sometimes viewed as the elephant in the room in mental health and psychosis. We know that people from racialised minorities are more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, more likely to be subject to the Mental Health Act, and more likely to be restrained or be under a Community Treatment Order. And yet- it seems to many working or campaigning in the field that we have failed to address these issues, and that too little has changed over the past few decades.

How do start talking about and addressing institutional racism, when so often it can feel invisible or taboo? How does institutional racism affect people who use services, but also family members and carers, and professionals (psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, OTs, HCAs etc) who deliver services? What are the barriers which stop us talking about it – and how do we address what we struggle to recognise?

This day will encourage discussion & reflection on how institutional racism plays out in the field of psychosis, from multiple perspectives. We will reflect on how we can name it, and how, together, we can start to find ways of addressingSpeakers: 

Dr Suman Fernando, Honorary Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, London Metropolitan University and former (retired) consultant psychiatrist

Dr Philip Thomas and Dr Alison Faulkner on the Privilege, Partiality and Power of Whiteness

Sara Haq on Complex Subjectivities and Survival Strategies for Collective/Cultural Psychosis

Dr Colin King

Followed by ISPS UK AGM, 17.00-17.30

All are welcome to attend

Details of the day:

Coffee and lunch will be provided. Please contact us if you have any questions about the day or access.

Nov
27
Tue
2018
Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS- Belfast @ Olympic 3 Room, Clayton Hotel Belfast
Nov 27 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS

Join us in Belfast on 27 November 2018, 18.00-20.00, for an evening of dialogue with guest panel featuring May McCann, Jamie Murphy, Ciaran Shannon and Clive Travis (who will chair the discussion). FREE for ISPS UK members, full price £10, unwaged £5.

A core aim of ISPS UK is to promote social and psychological approaches to psychosis – yet in a culture of increasing cuts and short term fixes, this is no easy task. Join us for an evening of discussion, debate and exploration to consider some of the challenges to embedding psychosocial approaches within the NHS and some practical steps we can all take to address these.

Details of panel members:

May McCann is the Chair of CAUSE, a unique peer-led regional charity offering services to families, partners and friends across Northern Ireland caring for a loved one who has experienced serious mental illness. She has been involved with CAUSE for many years,  both as a board member and as a member of staff, when for a limited period of time she  worked part time as CAUSE carer advocate in the, then, Sperrin and Lakeland Trust, now the southern part of the Western Trust. For most of her career she lectured in Social Anthropology at Queens University Belfast, with particular interest in Diversity, Minority Ethnic Groups, Women’s Studies and Irish Studies.  In 2009 she was appointed by the Minister for HSSPSNI as a non-executive director of the newly established Patient and Client Council an independent, arms-length public body tasked with ensuring that the voice of all people on health and social care is sought, listened to and acted upon. She has been recently reappointed for a further period of office in this role. She also chairs the Bamford Monitoring Group whose role it is to seek and make known to the Minister, department, trusts and other relevant bodies, the views and experiences of people – service users, carers, the public and communities – concerning the changes being made to services resulting from the Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability.

Professor Jamie Murphy is a Professor of psychology and a member of the Psychology Research Institute at Ulster University. He has investigated the expression of psychosis and the co-occurrence of psychological trauma and psychosis for the past 10 years. Challenging traditional disease based conceptualisations of psychosis, Jamie’s research has demonstrated that extreme perceptual, belief and behavioural abnormalities such as hallucinations, delusions and mania often emerge in, and can be understood against, a context of extreme life trauma and adversity. Funded by the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 initiative and the UK Economic and Social Research Council, Jamie is published in some of the world’s leading psychiatry and psychology journals, and collaborates with some of the world’s leading authorities in the area. Core branches of his research include: the psychosis continuum; psychotraumatology; childhood sexual abuse and psychosis; social isolation and psychosis; trauma-cannabis interaction and psychosis; and suicidality-psychosis co-occurrence. Jamie is also the training coordinator for The Collaborative Network for Training and Excellence in Psychotraumatology (CONTEXT), an EU funded international, interdisciplinary doctoral training programme involving nine European partner organisations spanning the academic, non-governmental, voluntary, and public sectors.

Dr Ciaran Shannon is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist in The Northern Health and Social Care Trust. His area of specialism for over 20 years is psychological intervention and service provision for those with a diagnosis of severe mental health problems.  His particular research interest is on the effect that trauma (including “Troubles-related” trauma) has on the presentation of these problems.  He has over 40 peer reviewed publications including a co-authored book – “Models of Mental Health”. Currently he manages the only psychosis prevention team on the island of Ireland (The STEP team) and manages the Trust’s Centre of Mental Health Research.

Dr Clive Hathaway Travis (Chair of the discussion) spent the years 1994-2004 experiencing paranoid schizophrenia while learning about how severe oppression felt, in his case from the side effect profiles of all of the antipsychotics he was prescribed, either by force, or the threat of it, during those years. He both escaped from hospital, absconded, and on a third occasion was on the run for over a year. In 2004 however he finally became a success of the medical model by finding an antipsychotic he did not mind taking and has avoided hospital since. He now has over 1200 engagements under his belt as an expert patient in the health and social care arena and has had the story of his journey, Looking for Prince Charles’s Dog, published and with all royalties going to charity: over £4,000 to date, one of the charities being Speedwell Trust in Dungannon. He defines psychological therapy as anything not involving adverse antipsychotics and was recently named Deputy Prime Minister Mental Health Hero (East). He is from Bedforshire and is a former ISPS Committee member.

FREE for ISPS members (join here). ISPS UK membership starts at £35/year and includes free entry to local events, discounted enttry to national events, a subscription to Psychosis journal, and a monthly e-newsletter.

For non ISPS members, entry is £10 or £5 for low earners. Book your ticket here.

Feb
13
Wed
2019
Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of health & social care- Preston @ Preston Quaker Meeting House
Feb 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Description

The panel will each give a twenty minute talk about the challenges and successes in regard to placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of health and social care. Then we will open the dicussion up to the audience for debate and dicussion.

The panel members are as follows:

Jill Hemmington has worked in mental health services for around 30 years and now works at the University of Central Lancashire where she teaches Mental Health Social Work and Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) training. She practices as an AMHP (carrying out Mental Health Act (MHA) assessments) and is currently undertaking research around service users’ involvement and the potential for Shared Decision Making within MHA assessments and hospital detention. Jill is particularly interested in beliefs about ‘capacity’, ‘insight’ and ‘consent’ where individuals are experiencing psychosis.

Jhilmil Breckenridge is a poet, writer and activist. She is the Founder of Bhor Foundation, an Indian charity, which is active in mental health advocacy, the trauma informed approach, and enabling other choices to heal apart from or in addition to the biomedical model. She advocates Poetry as Therapy and is working on a few initiatives, both in the UK and India, taking this into prisons and asylums. Jhilmil also heads a team leading Mad in Asia Pacific; this is an online e-zine magazine working for better rights, justice and inclusion for people with psychosocial disability in the Asia Pacific region. She is currently working on a PhD in Creative Writing in the UK. For the last three years, she has also been leading an online poetry as therapy group for women recovering from domestic violence. Her debut poetry collection, Reclamation Song, was published in May 2018. She tweets at @jhilmilspirit.

Helen Spandler is Professor of Mental Health Studies at the UCLan and the managing editor of Asylum: the radical mental health magazinehttp://asylummagazine.org/. She is the author and editor of many books and articles in the field of mental health – mostly recently, for example,Madness, Distress and the Politics of Disablement (Policy Press). Helen has had significant experience trying to support family members and friends through periods of psychosis and breakdown. She is committed learning from psychiatric survivors and finding alternatives to conventional mental health systems.

Jun
8
Sat
2019
Extreme Experiences – Mental Illnesses or Dangerous Gifts?
Jun 8 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

 

 

This is a talk for people interested in exploring experiences of “mental illness” outside of a traditional medical model framework. Those of us who are more sensitive and tend towards extreme experiences have abilities that can be cultivated into gifts.

Book here

Sascha Altman DuBrul is the co-founder of the Icarus Project (www.theicarusproject.net), a network of peer based mental health support groups and media project that is actively redefining the language and culture of mental health and illness. He has a Masters in Social Work and worked from 2016-2019 as a Recovery Specialist and Trainer at Columbia’s Center for Practice Innovations at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. He is currently the Training Director for the Institute for the Development of Human Arts (www.idha-nyc.org) He is the co-author of Navigating the Space Between Brilliance and Madness, Friends Make the Best Medicine: A Guide to Creating Community Mental Health Support Networks, and the author of Maps to the Other Side: The Adventures of a Bipolar Cartographer. Sascha’s intellectual and creative interests lie at the intersection of the public mental heath system and the Mad Underground. (www.mapstotheotherside.net)

Sascha will be doing a talk and then we will have questions from the audience followed by a group discussion.

The venue is in central Manchester. There is a pay for car park close by and is walking distance from Victoria Station.

Please e mail catonneil1009@gmail.com with any questions.

Event in association with Asylum Magazine and CCrAMHP

Jun
26
Wed
2019
Psychosis: Origins, Experience and Meaning
Jun 26 @ 9:30 am – 5:00 pm

 

A one day conference organised by ISPS UK Southcoast Network in collaboration with Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton and the Spiritual Crisis Network Brighton

Book here

This ticketed event is open to practitioners, people with lived experience of psychosis, families, carers, academics, researchers and anyone with an interest in the subject of psychosis.

The first event of its kind for the South Coast, this one-day conference initiated and promoted by ISPS UK South Coast Network in collaboration with local organisations including Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton, and the Spiritual Crisis Network Brighton. It is hoped that this conference will be the beginning of a regular Annual South Coast Network Conference programme. The conference is part of the National ISPS UK post-Liverpool Congress Strategy of ‘keeping psycho-social approaches at the heart of the NHS’.

Our guest speaker in the morning is Professor John Read, a highly regarded and internationally acclaimed academic and clinical psychologist/researcher whose research areas include the psycho-social causes of psychosis and psychological treatment for persons with psychosis (a term which includes persons diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia’).

Our second guest speaker in the afternoon is Sascha Altman DuBrulwho is here in the UK on a speaking tour during the summer and is willing to share his expertise with us. Sascha is an educationalist and activist from the radical advocacy movement in the USA who is a highly regarded campaigner for the promotion of alternatives in mental health and is one of the founders of the Icarus Project.

The programme will be complemented by an alternating series of morning and afternoon workshops showcasing the work of local and regional organisations featuring Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton, the Spiritual Crisis Network and the Kent Open Dialogue Service. The workshops will also provide an opportunity to reflect upon and explore the nature of psychosis and approaches to ‘being with’ psychosis.

More information

Registration open at 9.00am.

Please note that coffee on registration, mid morning and afternoon is included in the conference fee but delegates are advised to make their own arrangements for lunch. There are many eateries in the vicinity and there are a number of park/garden areas for picnic lunches. The Brighthelm Centre also has a good cafe serving food and drinks.

Parking Advice

Please be advised that parking is limited and available only on a pay per hour/day basis in and around the vicinity of the venue. Delegates are advised to use public transport where available. The venue is a convenient 2 – 3 minute walk from Brighton mainline station.

Oct
5
Sat
2019
Hearing Voices in Brazil @ Niamos Radical Arts & Cultural Centre
Oct 5 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Screening of a award winning film followed by a discussion with 9 Brazilian mental health professionals.

The film will be followed by a discussion about Mental Health in Brazil with 9 mental health workers from Brazil

This award winning film is about three people who hear voices and who are members of one of the first hearing voices groups in Brazil.

The film was made in collaboration with the group.

It is an empowering and emotional journey as we learn about their lives, their families and their hope and dreams.

It has English subtitles.

We will view the film followed by a discussion of human rights, activism and poverty in relation to hearing voices and the development of the hearing voices movement in Brazil and across the world.