Events & Conferences

Nov
27
Tue
2018
Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS- Belfast @ Olympic 3 Room, Clayton Hotel Belfast
Nov 27 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of the NHS

Join us in Belfast on 27 November 2018, 18.00-20.00, for an evening of dialogue with guest panel featuring May McCann, Jamie Murphy, Ciaran Shannon and Clive Travis (who will chair the discussion). FREE for ISPS UK members, full price £10, unwaged £5.

A core aim of ISPS UK is to promote social and psychological approaches to psychosis – yet in a culture of increasing cuts and short term fixes, this is no easy task. Join us for an evening of discussion, debate and exploration to consider some of the challenges to embedding psychosocial approaches within the NHS and some practical steps we can all take to address these.

Details of panel members:

May McCann is the Chair of CAUSE, a unique peer-led regional charity offering services to families, partners and friends across Northern Ireland caring for a loved one who has experienced serious mental illness. She has been involved with CAUSE for many years,  both as a board member and as a member of staff, when for a limited period of time she  worked part time as CAUSE carer advocate in the, then, Sperrin and Lakeland Trust, now the southern part of the Western Trust. For most of her career she lectured in Social Anthropology at Queens University Belfast, with particular interest in Diversity, Minority Ethnic Groups, Women’s Studies and Irish Studies.  In 2009 she was appointed by the Minister for HSSPSNI as a non-executive director of the newly established Patient and Client Council an independent, arms-length public body tasked with ensuring that the voice of all people on health and social care is sought, listened to and acted upon. She has been recently reappointed for a further period of office in this role. She also chairs the Bamford Monitoring Group whose role it is to seek and make known to the Minister, department, trusts and other relevant bodies, the views and experiences of people – service users, carers, the public and communities – concerning the changes being made to services resulting from the Bamford Review of Mental Health and Learning Disability.

Professor Jamie Murphy is a Professor of psychology and a member of the Psychology Research Institute at Ulster University. He has investigated the expression of psychosis and the co-occurrence of psychological trauma and psychosis for the past 10 years. Challenging traditional disease based conceptualisations of psychosis, Jamie’s research has demonstrated that extreme perceptual, belief and behavioural abnormalities such as hallucinations, delusions and mania often emerge in, and can be understood against, a context of extreme life trauma and adversity. Funded by the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 initiative and the UK Economic and Social Research Council, Jamie is published in some of the world’s leading psychiatry and psychology journals, and collaborates with some of the world’s leading authorities in the area. Core branches of his research include: the psychosis continuum; psychotraumatology; childhood sexual abuse and psychosis; social isolation and psychosis; trauma-cannabis interaction and psychosis; and suicidality-psychosis co-occurrence. Jamie is also the training coordinator for The Collaborative Network for Training and Excellence in Psychotraumatology (CONTEXT), an EU funded international, interdisciplinary doctoral training programme involving nine European partner organisations spanning the academic, non-governmental, voluntary, and public sectors.

Dr Ciaran Shannon is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist in The Northern Health and Social Care Trust. His area of specialism for over 20 years is psychological intervention and service provision for those with a diagnosis of severe mental health problems.  His particular research interest is on the effect that trauma (including “Troubles-related” trauma) has on the presentation of these problems.  He has over 40 peer reviewed publications including a co-authored book – “Models of Mental Health”. Currently he manages the only psychosis prevention team on the island of Ireland (The STEP team) and manages the Trust’s Centre of Mental Health Research.

Dr Clive Hathaway Travis (Chair of the discussion) spent the years 1994-2004 experiencing paranoid schizophrenia while learning about how severe oppression felt, in his case from the side effect profiles of all of the antipsychotics he was prescribed, either by force, or the threat of it, during those years. He both escaped from hospital, absconded, and on a third occasion was on the run for over a year. In 2004 however he finally became a success of the medical model by finding an antipsychotic he did not mind taking and has avoided hospital since. He now has over 1200 engagements under his belt as an expert patient in the health and social care arena and has had the story of his journey, Looking for Prince Charles’s Dog, published and with all royalties going to charity: over £4,000 to date, one of the charities being Speedwell Trust in Dungannon. He defines psychological therapy as anything not involving adverse antipsychotics and was recently named Deputy Prime Minister Mental Health Hero (East). He is from Bedforshire and is a former ISPS Committee member.

FREE for ISPS members (join here). ISPS UK membership starts at £35/year and includes free entry to local events, discounted enttry to national events, a subscription to Psychosis journal, and a monthly e-newsletter.

For non ISPS members, entry is £10 or £5 for low earners. Book your ticket here.

Feb
13
Wed
2019
Placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of health & social care- Preston @ Preston Quaker Meeting House
Feb 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Description

The panel will each give a twenty minute talk about the challenges and successes in regard to placing psychosocial approaches to psychosis at the heart of health and social care. Then we will open the dicussion up to the audience for debate and dicussion.

The panel members are as follows:

Jill Hemmington has worked in mental health services for around 30 years and now works at the University of Central Lancashire where she teaches Mental Health Social Work and Approved Mental Health Professional (AMHP) training. She practices as an AMHP (carrying out Mental Health Act (MHA) assessments) and is currently undertaking research around service users’ involvement and the potential for Shared Decision Making within MHA assessments and hospital detention. Jill is particularly interested in beliefs about ‘capacity’, ‘insight’ and ‘consent’ where individuals are experiencing psychosis.

Jhilmil Breckenridge is a poet, writer and activist. She is the Founder of Bhor Foundation, an Indian charity, which is active in mental health advocacy, the trauma informed approach, and enabling other choices to heal apart from or in addition to the biomedical model. She advocates Poetry as Therapy and is working on a few initiatives, both in the UK and India, taking this into prisons and asylums. Jhilmil also heads a team leading Mad in Asia Pacific; this is an online e-zine magazine working for better rights, justice and inclusion for people with psychosocial disability in the Asia Pacific region. She is currently working on a PhD in Creative Writing in the UK. For the last three years, she has also been leading an online poetry as therapy group for women recovering from domestic violence. Her debut poetry collection, Reclamation Song, was published in May 2018. She tweets at @jhilmilspirit.

Helen Spandler is Professor of Mental Health Studies at the UCLan and the managing editor of Asylum: the radical mental health magazinehttp://asylummagazine.org/. She is the author and editor of many books and articles in the field of mental health – mostly recently, for example,Madness, Distress and the Politics of Disablement (Policy Press). Helen has had significant experience trying to support family members and friends through periods of psychosis and breakdown. She is committed learning from psychiatric survivors and finding alternatives to conventional mental health systems.

Jun
8
Sat
2019
Extreme Experiences – Mental Illnesses or Dangerous Gifts?
Jun 8 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

 

 

This is a talk for people interested in exploring experiences of “mental illness” outside of a traditional medical model framework. Those of us who are more sensitive and tend towards extreme experiences have abilities that can be cultivated into gifts.

Book here

Sascha Altman DuBrul is the co-founder of the Icarus Project (www.theicarusproject.net), a network of peer based mental health support groups and media project that is actively redefining the language and culture of mental health and illness. He has a Masters in Social Work and worked from 2016-2019 as a Recovery Specialist and Trainer at Columbia’s Center for Practice Innovations at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. He is currently the Training Director for the Institute for the Development of Human Arts (www.idha-nyc.org) He is the co-author of Navigating the Space Between Brilliance and Madness, Friends Make the Best Medicine: A Guide to Creating Community Mental Health Support Networks, and the author of Maps to the Other Side: The Adventures of a Bipolar Cartographer. Sascha’s intellectual and creative interests lie at the intersection of the public mental heath system and the Mad Underground. (www.mapstotheotherside.net)

Sascha will be doing a talk and then we will have questions from the audience followed by a group discussion.

The venue is in central Manchester. There is a pay for car park close by and is walking distance from Victoria Station.

Please e mail catonneil1009@gmail.com with any questions.

Event in association with Asylum Magazine and CCrAMHP

Jun
26
Wed
2019
Psychosis: Origins, Experience and Meaning
Jun 26 @ 9:30 am – 5:00 pm

 

A one day conference organised by ISPS UK Southcoast Network in collaboration with Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton and the Spiritual Crisis Network Brighton

Book here

This ticketed event is open to practitioners, people with lived experience of psychosis, families, carers, academics, researchers and anyone with an interest in the subject of psychosis.

The first event of its kind for the South Coast, this one-day conference initiated and promoted by ISPS UK South Coast Network in collaboration with local organisations including Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton, and the Spiritual Crisis Network Brighton. It is hoped that this conference will be the beginning of a regular Annual South Coast Network Conference programme. The conference is part of the National ISPS UK post-Liverpool Congress Strategy of ‘keeping psycho-social approaches at the heart of the NHS’.

Our guest speaker in the morning is Professor John Read, a highly regarded and internationally acclaimed academic and clinical psychologist/researcher whose research areas include the psycho-social causes of psychosis and psychological treatment for persons with psychosis (a term which includes persons diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia’).

Our second guest speaker in the afternoon is Sascha Altman DuBrulwho is here in the UK on a speaking tour during the summer and is willing to share his expertise with us. Sascha is an educationalist and activist from the radical advocacy movement in the USA who is a highly regarded campaigner for the promotion of alternatives in mental health and is one of the founders of the Icarus Project.

The programme will be complemented by an alternating series of morning and afternoon workshops showcasing the work of local and regional organisations featuring Soteria Brighton, Hearing Voices Brighton, the Spiritual Crisis Network and the Kent Open Dialogue Service. The workshops will also provide an opportunity to reflect upon and explore the nature of psychosis and approaches to ‘being with’ psychosis.

More information

Registration open at 9.00am.

Please note that coffee on registration, mid morning and afternoon is included in the conference fee but delegates are advised to make their own arrangements for lunch. There are many eateries in the vicinity and there are a number of park/garden areas for picnic lunches. The Brighthelm Centre also has a good cafe serving food and drinks.

Parking Advice

Please be advised that parking is limited and available only on a pay per hour/day basis in and around the vicinity of the venue. Delegates are advised to use public transport where available. The venue is a convenient 2 – 3 minute walk from Brighton mainline station.

Oct
5
Sat
2019
Hearing Voices in Brazil @ Niamos Radical Arts & Cultural Centre
Oct 5 @ 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Screening of a award winning film followed by a discussion with 9 Brazilian mental health professionals.

The film will be followed by a discussion about Mental Health in Brazil with 9 mental health workers from Brazil

This award winning film is about three people who hear voices and who are members of one of the first hearing voices groups in Brazil.

The film was made in collaboration with the group.

It is an empowering and emotional journey as we learn about their lives, their families and their hope and dreams.

It has English subtitles.

We will view the film followed by a discussion of human rights, activism and poverty in relation to hearing voices and the development of the hearing voices movement in Brazil and across the world.